Queen's University IRC

Research Briefs – September 2018

 
Queen's University IRC - Research Briefs

   Bringing Practitioner-Focused Research to People Management Practitioners

Sept 2018   

 

 
 

In This Issue…

  1. Building Trust and Increasing Employee Engagement in the Workplace
  2. Invisible Barriers: Accommodating Mental Illness in the Workplace
  3. Flashback Feature:
    Organized Labour in Canada and the United States: Similarities and Differences
  Queen's University Campus 
 

Building Trust and Increasing Employee Engagement in the Workplace
How HR Business Partners and Managers Can Work Together for Success
Sandi Cardillo, Queen’s IRC Facilitator, 2018

Ben was concerned. Emma, a manager new to his group, had just received her employee engagement scores. They were not good. Emma had been a rock star in her previous individual contributor role. She was seen as talent for the future in the organization. As her HR Business Partner, Ben had watched her struggle as a first-time manager. Now, it appeared that her employee team was willing to put those struggles on paper in the form of not so good engagement scores. This had always been a good team. But their responses were a strong signal to Ben that something was not right.

“Emma, let’s talk about what these employee engagement scores might mean,” Ben said.

“I know, Ben,” she replied. “I am trying so hard to get this managing thing right. I am not happy with the responses and how the group sees me right now. This is such a good team. The one that really bothers me is the feedback from the ‘do you trust your manager?’ question. I’ve always thought of myself as a pretty trust worthy person, so this one really bothers me. I can’t seem to find a way to earn my team’s confidence and trust.”

“Emma,” he replied, “I’ve been doing a lot of studying on how managers build trust on their teams since we started this whole employee engagement initiative. We are trying to understand how what we do in HR helps build trust in the organization. Would you consider studying with me? I really want to help you. We can learn together”. “Ben, that would be great,” Emma replied. “Let’s do it!”

>> Download Article

Invisible Barriers: Accommodating Mental Illness in the Workplace
Deborah Hudson, Lawyer, Turnpenney Milne LLP, 2016

Mental illness is a leading cause of disability in Canada.(1) In fact, at least 500,000 employed Canadians are not able to work due to mental health problems in any given week.(2) Twenty percent of Canadians will personally experience a mental illness in their lifetime, and it is likely that all of us will be directly or indirectly impacted by mental illness through family members, friends or colleagues.(3) As Canadians and medical professionals increase awareness and understanding regarding mental illness, our workplace and human rights laws similarly evolve in attempts to protect mental illnesses like any other disability. While our laws strive to provide adequate workplace protections in relation to mental illness, the art of managing mental health accommodations remains challenging for employers and employees alike.

Visible or physical disabilities can often be easier to understand and to accommodate. Defined physical restrictions or recovery periods provide finite terms which are easier to address and are easier to accept as legitimate needs. Accommodating the invisible barriers presented by mental illness often remains far more challenging. Many persons experiencing mental illness may not wish to share details in the workplace, fearing stigmatization, embarrassment or privacy issues. Other persons may lack awareness that they are undergoing a health-related issue. For example, those struggling with addiction may have little or no self-knowledge that a medically recognized disability drives their compulsion to use. Adults experiencing their first episode related to mental illness may not recognize the signs and symptoms until weeks, months or years after the occasion.

Employers face a variety of different but equally challenging situations. For instance, when an employee silently struggles, employers may be tasked with difficult conversations to ensure adequate inquiry while not overreaching.

>> Download Article

Flashback Feature:
Organized Labour in Canada and the United States: Similarities and Differences
Pradeep Kumar, 1987

Labour movements in Canada and the United States have much in common and close historical ties. They are bound together by a common continental heritage, interdependent product and labour markets, and a similar labour relations framework in the two countries. International unions, with predominant membership and head offices in the United States, are an integral part of the Canadian labour movement. Unions in the two countries share common goals and beliefs, have similar functions and organizational structures, and have been fighting in recent years an uphill battle for legitimacy in face of a hostile and challenging economic, social, political, and technological environment.

This paper was presented at the 36th Annual Conference of the Association of Labor Relations Agencies, held in Albany, New York, July 26-31, 1987.

>> Download Article

 

 

   

Upcoming Programs

Designing Collaborative Workplaces
Sept 18-20, 2018
Ottawa

Labour Relations Foundations
Sept 23-28, 2018
Kingston

Coaching Skills
Sept 26-27, 2018
Edmonton

Performance Management
Oct 10-11, 2018
Toronto

Change Management
Oct 16-18, 2018
Kingston

Negotiation Skills
Oct 21-26, 2018
Kingston

HR Metrics and Analytics
Oct 23-25, 2018
Toronto

Strategies for Workplace Conflicts
Oct 30-Nov 1, 2018
Toronto

Building Trust in the Workplace
Nov 1, 2018
Toronto

Organization Development Foundations
Nov 6-9, 2018
Toronto

Mastering Fact-Finding and Investigation
Nov 6-9, 2018
Victoria

Coaching Skills
Nov 21-22, 2018
Toronto

Advanced HR
Nov 14-16, 2018
Toronto

NEW Workplace Restoration
Nov 20-22, 2018
Kingston

Organizational Design
Nov 27-29, 2018
Ottawa

Managing Unionized Environments
Nov 27-29, 2018
Toronto

Negotiation Skills
Dec 3-7, 2018
Victoria

Talent Management
Dec 4-5, 2018
Toronto

Download our
2018-2019
Program Planner

HR Reporter Readers' Choice Awards - Labour Relations Training

Contact Us: irc@queensu.ca
1-888-858-7838 irc.queensu.ca

Queen’s IRC on LinkedIn Queen’s IRC on Twitter Queen’s IRC on Facebook
Queen’s IRC on Google+Queen’s IRC on YouTube

 
 

Copyright 2018 Queen’s University IRC, Robert Sutherland Hall, 138 Union Street, Kingston, ON K7L 2P1
Call 1-888-858-7838 | Email IRC@QueensU.ca | Visit us online at irc.queensu.ca

Scroll to Top