E-News - December 2019 | Queen's University IRC

Queen's University IRC

Queen's University

Queen's University IRC - irc.queensu.ca

December 2019    

 
 
 

Articles

 
 

 

Creating Kinder, More Productive Workplaces: Ongoing and Everyday Conflict Engagement
Joan Sabott, Queen’s IRC Facilitator, 2019

 Ongoing and Everyday Conflict EngagementConflict is tough for most of us.
According to many physiologists, we tend to tap into several simple strategies when faced with conflict: fight, flight, or freeze. As a result, we likely aren’t reducing unnecessary conflicts, and effectively dealing with necessary conflicts in productive ways. So many opportunities are lost because we aren’t engaging well. Being effective at conflict, both in a proactive and reactive way, demands that we work at it as an ongoing and everyday activity. In essence, it is a lifestyle choice in how we talk, problem solve, inquire with others, and arrange our processes and teams.

There are a number of choices, activities, and strategies that can be used to enhance your organization’s ability to handle conflict in a better way. The following are just a few:

  1. Hold People Accountable for Negative Behaviors and Celebrate Positive Behaviors
    In working with organizations and leaders in many fields, I have found a few common missteps in conflict. One is the mishandling or lack of dealing with toxic people in our workplaces. They often get passes because they are good at their jobs or they are retiring soon, among various other reasons. The trouble is that they are doing grave damage to our teams and they also are setting a norm that bad behavior is allowed. Ultimately, we create workplace monsters by allowing the negative behaviors. Therefore, skills are needed to hold people responsible and foster realistic change.

>> Read Article


4 Strategies for Collective Bargaining in Today’s Economy
Gary T. Furlong, Queen’s IRC Facilitator, 2016

4 Strategies for Collective Bargaining in Today's EconomyWe have entered a challenging and difficult time for collective bargaining for both employers and unions. Shortly following the great recession in 2008, both management and unions reached deals relatively quickly, everyone recognizing the dramatic economic issues the parties faced at the time. From 2008 well into 2012, there was little change. Employers tried to deal with the reality of the recession, and unions waited for the anticipated rebound, assuming it would resemble almost all recessions of the past - a difficult period, a holding pattern for a short time, followed by a return to growth in the economy and a resumption of “normal” bargaining. This time, however, that hasn’t happened. Certainly not in the way it has in the past.

The economy has, at best, rebounded to the level of “treading water”, and bargaining has not returned to anything resembling “normal” for the last 30 years. Organizations are looking for zero wage increases, looking to fund increases from savings within the agreement, and looking for amendments to benefits and pension plans as well. These are challenging and difficult issues, so how can negotiators achieve deals that can be ratified? How do union and management bargaining teams navigate these issues when the economy has stagnated? At times when government revenue is anemic, deficits are up, and private sector profits are much lower than normal? At times when unemployment is steady, but steady at a level that is over 3 percent higher than in the United States? At times when manufacturing jobs, long considered the backbone of a strong economy, have disappeared with few signs of rebounding?

>> Read Article

 

 
 
 

Latest News

 
 

 

Start 2020 off right with a program from Queen's IRC!

Register for a 2020 program and save!At Queen's IRC, our professional development programs in human resources, labour relations and organizational development are led by industry leaders with real-world expertise, and based on 80 years of experience and best practices that bring results.

This holiday season, give yourself the gift of knowledge. Take advantage of our 2019 prices and save $750 on 4-5 day programs and $350 on 2-3 day programs when you register on or before December 31, 2019. This limited time offer only applies to 2020 programs.

>> See a Full List of Programs and Register

 

 
 
 

Upcoming Programs

 
 

 

Register for an Upcoming Program:

For an overview of our professional development training, from the perspective of our participants and speakers, please check out our Queen’s IRC Video.

For more program information, download our Fall 2019-Fall 2020 Program Planner.

Email: irc@queensu.ca
Phone: 1-888-858-7838
Web: irc.queensu.ca

Queen’s IRC on LinkedIn Queen’s IRC on Twitter Queen’s IRC on Facebook Queen’s IRC on YouTube
HR Reporter Readers' Choice Awards - Labour Relations TrainingHR Reporter Readers' Choice Awards - Management - Executive Development
 
 
 
 

Copyright 2019 Queen's University IRC, Executive House, 275 Ontario St., Kingston, ON K7K 2X5
Call 1-888-858-7838 | Email IRC@QueensU.ca | Visit us online at irc.queensu.ca