An Inquiry into the State of HR in Canada in 2020

We invite all HR professionals to participate in our survey on the State of Human Resources in Canada in 2020.

This survey is now closed.

This survey follows research of the same nature that we conducted in 2011 and 2013 under the leadership of Queen’s IRC Director, Paul Juniper. We estimate it will take about 20-30 minutes of your time.

The survey has two parts. The first section asks demographic questions aimed to better understand the varied roles and responsibilities of Canada’s HR practitioners. The second section seeks perspectives on the HR profession.

For your participation, you’ll have a chance to win a $50 coffee card (ie: Tim Hortons or Starbucks). There will be an opportunity to enter the draw at the end of the survey, and there will be one $50 gift card for every 100 respondents.

We invite you to share your insights on the HR profession in Canada before the survey closes on June 30, 2020. Please pass this invitation along to any colleagues in the HR profession who could also share their insights.

Should you have any questions regarding Queen’s IRC’s practitioner-focused research, please contact our research team at IRCresearch@QueensU.ca.

Queen’s IRC response to COVID-19

We hope that you and your colleagues are staying safe during this pandemic. We are grateful for the essential staff in our community who have been working on the front lines to keep us safe, fed and healthy during this time.

Given the current Covid-19 situation, we have cancelled some programs and adjusted our fall 2020 program lineup. These changes are reflected on our website and affected participants have been contacted. We expect to resume in person programming when the government and public health officials advise that it is safe to do so.

In the meantime, the Queen’s IRC team is working diligently to develop remote learning options for some Fall 2020 programs. We are exploring alternate delivery methods and changes to our current models to ensure we are able to continue to help people in organizations during this unprecedented time. Please see our updates on virtual learning here:

We are offering a series of free Community of Practice (COP) webinars, to allow the IRC community to connect with our facilitators and discuss burning issues in labour relations, human resources and organizational development. Information about upcoming COP sessions:

One of the hallmarks of Queen’s IRC programming is face-to-face learning, and we are anxious to get back to the classroom when it is safe to do so. We are highly invested in preserving the participant experience, networking opportunities, learning outcomes and classroom experience our programs are known for, while ensuring that we provide a safe and healthy learning environment.

We will be instituting additional measures to ensure optimal health and hygienic conditions during our programs, including increased distance between participants at tables, access to hand sanitizer and reminders about frequent handwashing, venue cleanliness management, and reminding participants with any symptoms of illness to stay at home.

Queen’s IRC is in regular contact with our university and venue partners and we continue to monitor the situation as it progresses. Further information is available from Queen’s University on the current situation at: https://www.queensu.ca/covidinfo/.

If you have any questions or concerns in regards to IRC programming or your registration, we encourage you to contact our team at IRC@QueensU.ca.

Please stay safe and stay home!

Sincerely,

Stephanie Noel
Director
Queen’s University IRC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Announcement: Retirement of Paul Juniper

It is with mixed emotions that we announce that Paul Juniper has decided to retire after more than 10 years as the Director of the Queen’s University Industrial Relations Centre (Queen’s IRC).

Paul became the sixth Director of Queen’s IRC in 2006. During his time as Director, Paul expanded the IRC’s professional development programs to cities across Canada and internationally. He introduced a number of new human resources and labour relations programs, and conducted research into the state of the HR profession. He also developed and designed the Queen’s IRC Advanced HR Certificate to meet the increasingly complex professional development needs of HR practitioners.

Queen’s IRC has been a leading provider of premium professional development programs in labour relations, human resources, and organizational development since 1937, and has expanded and evolved over the past decade thanks to Paul’s exemplary leadership.

Paul will be greatly missed. We wish him all the best in his retirement. Fortunately, he will continue to serve as a facilitator for Queen’s IRC.

Stephanie Noel has been with Queen’s IRC for over 15 years. As the Business Development Manager, she was responsible for ensuring that the design and delivery of each program adhered to Queen’s IRC’s standard of excellence. She led the Queen’s IRC Program team as well as the Sales & Marketing team, and has been instrumental in developing and strengthening the IRC’s relationships with organizations and participants.

Stephanie Noel has been appointed the new Queen’s IRC Director, effective July 1, 2018.

Stephanie has worked with clients to tailor custom training programs specifically to their organization’s learning needs, and over the years, she has developed customized certificate programs with various organizations, including private sector, government and union organizations. Stephanie’s research interests include change management and labour relations practices.

Stephanie earned her Bachelor of Arts in Economics (Honours) degree from Laurentian University, and earned her Masters of Business Administration from Royal Military College of Canada.

Congratulations Stephanie!

 

Celebrating 80 Years of Transformative Professional Programs at Queen’s IRC

This fall, Queen’s IRC is celebrating its 80th anniversary, and to celebrate this milestone we’re offering you the chance to win $1,000 off your next IRC professional development program!

Over the past 80 years, Queen’s IRC has supported thousands of Human Resources, Labour Relations and Organizational Development professionals through countless changes and transitions in the workplace. Throughout our long history of presenting well-respected and well-attended programs and conferences, we have consistently developed and refined programs to reflect current trends and issues.

Queen’s University originally introduced the study of Industrial Relations on October 12, 1937, when the University formed the Industrial Relations Section. It was the first department of its kind in the country, a true pioneer. In 1960, the Queen’s Industrial Relations Section was renamed the Industrial Relations Centre (IRC).  You can read more of our history on our website: About Us.

To celebrate 80 years of transformative professional programs at Queen’s IRC, you can enter our draw to win one of eight $1,000 IRC Gift Cards!

Details:

  • A total of eight (8) $1000 gift cards will be given away – total prizes worth $8000
  • Gift cards may be combined with early-bird discounts, group discounts or other special promotions
  • Limit one prize per person
  • Draw is open until December 31, 2017
  • Winners will be announced January 5, 2017
  • Gift cards must be used by December 31, 2018

(THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED.)

Queen’s IRC Certificate Fast Facts

Did you know that we offer Certificates in Advanced Human Resources, Organization Development, Labour Relations, and Advanced Labour Relations? When you place a Queen’s University IRC Certificate on your wall, it tells your colleagues that you have received leading skills-building education and that you are a committed continuous learner.

Certificate Fast Facts:

  • You need 12 credits to earn a certificate
  • 1 credit generally equals 1 training day
  • You can take programs in the order that best addresses your learning needs or fits your schedule
  • We offer programs across Canada
  • Certificates have prerequisites, but we can sometimes substitute these prerequisites depending on your experience – you still have to earn 12 credits to earn a certificate
  • In order to receive an Advanced Labour Relations Certificate, you must first earn the Labour Relations Certificate
  • Added bonus: credits never expire and there is no set time to complete your certificate

Visit our website for more information about our Certificates.

Still have questions? Contact us at 1-888-858-7838 or irc@queensu.ca.

FREE E-BOOK: The Easy, Hard & Tough Work of Managing Change

The tough work of change management is the critical piece in successful change projects. This tough work is often neglected by change leaders and change agents, who place too much emphasis on high-level change planning and not enough emphasis on implementation.

Based on more than twenty years of Dr. Carol A. Beatty’s research, The Easy, Hard & Tough Work of Managing Change walks you through the change management process, from start to finish.

This free e-book takes the complex concepts of change management and makes them as simple as possible, offering frameworks, guidelines, checklists and key questions to ensure that all of the important issues in a change initiative are not neglected. Case studies and examples enable the reader to work through these concepts and apply them to their own change initiatives.

Dr. Beatty draws conclusions about the key success factors of planned change, based on her change management research in hundreds of organizations and relevant literature.

In this e-book, you will learn:

  1. How to choose the right people with the right skills to plan and implement a successful change project, including a change champion, a steering committee, an executive sponsor and implementation teams.
  2. How to create a sense of urgency for the change throughout the organization.
  3. The steps to create an inspiring change vision that will truly motivate people to buy into the change.
  4. How to create a complete roadmap for implementing your change successfully, using a framework and key questions.
  5. Ways to deal with resistance to change, convert resisters and create support for the change.
  6. The essential role of communication during change, including a communications model and advice to help you develop your own communication plan.
  7. How to find a change leader with the skills and attributes of a true change champion.

Download the Free E-Book

Queen’s University IRC 2015 Workplace in Motion Summit Proceedings

The world of work is changing, and the most successful organizations and practitioners are those that understand how these changes impact the way they do business. To help them do so, and to foster further dialogue, Queen’s IRC hosted the Workplace in Motion Summit in Toronto on April 16th, 2015. Over 100 human resource, labour relations, and organizational development professionals from across Canada attended the Summit. Chaired by IRC facilitator Brenda Barker Scott, the Summit provided a forum to stimulate new ideas and new perspectives on the dynamic new world of work.

The Summit focused on a variety of questions of interest to today’s human resource, labour relations, and organizational development professionals. More specifically, it helped participants:

  • Identify issues and best practices related to current trends and practices in human resource manage­ment, labour relations, and organizational development.
  • Explore how rapidly emerging technologies are shaping and re-shaping modern workplaces and the way we work.
  • Investigate the impact of changing demographics on contemporary organizations.

This was all done with the intent of identifying how they can better lead change and promote excellence within and beyond their organizations and professional networks.

Over the course of the Summit, several themes emerged that were particularly critical to today’s human resource, labour relations, and organizational development professionals. These included the need to:

  • Manage change and transformation in order to advance organizational and professional interests with as little disruption as possible.
  • Create the physical space, infrastructure, technologies, and systems necessary to support a collaborative, open, and innovative workplace and work culture.
  • Engage, retain, and motivate the new generation of employees and to bridge inter-generational gaps in the workplace.
  • Think outside the box in order to appropriately encourage risk-taking and innovation.

This report elaborates on the most important questions, issues, and themes identified by Summit participants going forward.

Download Summit Proceedings

Peter Edwards Delivers 2015 W. D. Wood Lecture

Peter Edwards, Vice-President Human Resources and Labour Relations at Canadian Pacific, delivered the 2015 W. D. Wood Lecture on November 6, 2015 at Queen’s University. Peter spoke about the future of work, the future of the labour movement and how technology will impact jobs.

Peter urged the audience to think about how things like controlling trains remotely, driverless cars, and completely automated factories are going to profoundly change the world.

“We either change with or ahead of them, or we’re out of the business. The world’s going to change,” Peter said. “We are living in transformative times. We’ve had changes like this in the past, but there’s just so many technologies coming together. There’s 70 billion of them in your pocket that you didn’t even know about, 2 billion in the phone’s core processor alone. The changes that we’re seeing will never go backwards.”

Peter brought the discussion back to today, and to our system of collective bargaining. He discussed his own successes in collective bargaining and his refreshing approach to union-management relations. To be successful you have to build a relationship, not just go into the collective bargaining process expecting it to be adversarial.

>> Download the transcript of Peter’s lecture here.

>> View Photos from the lecture on Facebook

2015 Workplace in Motion Summit a Success

The inaugural Workplace in Motion Summit was held last week in Toronto, with over 100 people in attendance. The one-day Summit brought together Human Resources, Organizational Development and Labour Relations professionals from across the country to learn about the future of work, and examine the trends creating the new world of work.

Summit Chair Brenda Barker Scott shared the characteristics of the new employee, the new work and the new workplace. Infographics contrasting the old world vs new world in terms of the new employee, the new work and the new workplace provided a basis for discussion amongst participants.

Millennials from Shopify, Free the Children and Me to We, shared how their companies have created innovative workplaces that are attractive to new workers; Hugh Ritchie from OpenText discussed how technology is changing the world of work.

The afternoon featured break-out sessions with OD Leader Francoise Morissette, HR Leader Diane Locke, and LR Leader Anne Grant. Guest speakers in these sessions were from TELUS, Samsung, the City of Edmonton, and CUPE. They shared stories about successful culture change, workplace innovation, and attracting and retaining talent in their organizations.

Summit proceedings and more information will follow in the coming months.

View Pictures from the Summit on Facebook

View Infographics from the Summit on Facebook

Getting Ahead of the Shift: Summit Inspires Thoughtful Conversations About the Changing World of Work

With an impressive line-up of guest speakers and facilitators, the Queen’s IRC 2015 Workplace in Motion Summit brought together over 100 leaders in HR, OD and LR from across the country to engage in conversations about the workplace of the future, and the trends that are driving new models for organizational planning.

The Summit, held on April 16, 2015 in Toronto, featured a number of themes, including:

  • Talent: How do we engage, retain and motivate a new generation of workers?
  • Transformation:  How can organizations transform without trauma?
  • Making the shift: What do organizations need to do to shift to new models?
  • Managing overload: How do we keep up with evolving technology and trends?

What Matters in Today’s Workplace?

Summit Chair Brenda Barker Scott shared the characteristics of the new employee and introduced Courtney Jolliffe from Free the Children and James Prince from Me to We to talk about millennials at work. “Passion trumps choosing a location. We’re following what we’re passionate about,” said Jolliffe.  Jolliffe and Prince discussed what makes their jobs attractive, how they want to work, career expectations, and where in the world they want to work. They joked that, in true millennial fashion, they surveyed their teams to get input before their presentation – they prefer to work collaboratively and learn by interacting with their peer group.

“We don’t want our career to be limited by our job,” said Prince. He noted millennials have a flexible and fluid work-life balance and are seeking variation in their jobs.  Technology gives them the mobility to work anywhere in the world.

Brittany Forsyth, Vice President of Human Relations at Shopify, talked about the importance of culture in her organization.

“When we interview, we look at potential. Are they going to push their boundaries? Are they going to challenge other people? Are they ok with being challenged?” They want employees to fit their culture of innovation and resourcefulness.

The highlight of Forsyth’s presentation was the concept of Hack Days.  Every three months, Shopify employees are given two days to work on a special project that will improve the Shopify platform. They stop their day-to-day work and do something outside of their regular role. “It’s about creating the right environment for people to grow, learn, experiment and innovate,” Forsyth said. Many of the products and features created at Hack Days actually make it to market.

Hugh Ritchie from OpenText shared how technology is changing the world of work. “It has never been so disruptive,” he said. He discussed the impact of big data, the cloud, mobile, security, digital and the internet of things. He shared a number of facts and statistics:

  • There are generations that have ONLY known life with the internet.
  • Today more information is created every 2 days, than from 0 AD to 2003
  • 90% of world’s data was generated over the last 2 years
  • Mobile data traffic will grow 13X by 2017
  • 15 of 17 U.S. sectors have more data per company than the Library of Congress

A Deep Dive into HR, OD and LR

The afternoon featured break-out sessions with OD Leader Françoise Morissette, HR Leader Diane Locke, and LR Leader Anne Grant. Participants were able to choose two of the three sessions to attend, and then all attendees returned to the plenary for a large-group debrief.

Human Resources

Facilitator Diane Locke led a discussion around HR practices in a new work model, and introduced guest speakers from Telus and Samsung to share their best practices for attracting, developing, engaging and retaining talent.

Bryan Acker, Culture Change Ambassador with TELUS, discussed their Work Styles® program, which gives employees the flexibility to work when and where they are most effective, so they can focus on supporting an exceptional customer experience. He said this supports work-life balance, improves employee retention and delivers consistent productivity.  According to their new hire survey, work-life flexibility is shown to consistently be a talent attractor for TELUS.

Christine Greco, Vice President of Human Resources and Corporate Affairs at Samsung Canada, shared her company’s philosophy to have highly engaged, innovative “brand ambassadors” breaking boundaries in order to achieve long term success. Samsung’s work environment includes collaboration spaces, creativity rooms and a lounge/café. Their recognition program offers unique employee perks, and they are heavily involved within their communities.

Strategies and themes from the HR deep dive:

  • Creating organizations that are employee-centric
  • Encouraging collaborative connections
  • Mapping out varied career paths
  • Taking advantage of millennial strengths
  • Releasing collective leadership capacity

Organizational Development

Françoise Morissette opened the OD Session by talking about how the world is changing and organizations have to transform in order to remain relevant, sustainable, effective and successful. She introduced John Wilson, Corporate Culture Strategist with the City of Edmonton, to share how the City is strategically building a better city and changing their corporate culture.

The City of Edmonton’s long-term strategic plan, called The Way Ahead, establishes six 10-year strategic goals to achieve the City’s vision for Edmonton in 2040 and to direct long-term planning. Wilson shared the Citizen Dashboard, which provides performance information to the public about municipal services that support the City’s strategic plan.

Strategies and themes from the OD deep dive:

  • Culture shift needs leadership
  • Engage employees and clients to create solutions
  • Goals must be regularly measured, evaluated and adjusted
  • Build engagement and involvement through transparency and accountability
  • Find a vision, commit to the vision, and stay with the vision

Labour Relations

In the Labour Relations session, Anne Grant noted that, by 2031, it’s expected that one in three Canadian workers will be born in a different country, and that there will be roughly three people in the labour force for each retiree. Grant shared stories of unions cultivating strategic allies and partnerships, rather than adversarial rivalries in order to succeed in the global world.

Crystal Scott, past-president of CUPE Local 3521, told the group about turning around a fairly inactive local by increasing engagement, providing training to members (who hadn’t had training in almost 20 years), and working with management to create better processes and policies for her members. The session revealed that unions and employers deal with many of the same kinds of issues.

Strategies and themes from the LR deep dive:

  • We must develop partnerships and increase communication between unions across Canada, North America and internationally
  • Social technologies can increase membership and engagement
  • Bargain for more than monetary benefits
  • Honour seniority but embrace new talents and contributions
  • Form partnerships with employers to forge more collaborative, less adversarial relationships

What’s your one thing?

At the end of the day, participants were asked what “one thing” they would take action on when they returned to the workplace. The most common theme was a determination to increase collaboration – between colleagues, across teams, in change, in long-term strategies, and with senior leaders.

Other action items included:

  • Have the courage to search and advocate for best practices not just accept the status quo
  • Look for solutions not problems
  • Help to foster an environment where new ideas, innovation, improved processes, creativity and fun are all encouraged
  • Share at least 1 positive/optimistic thought with coworkers everyday
  • Think about what’s next and not get caught up in what’s right now
  • Invite and create more opportunities to hear other perspectives outside of my immediate team
  • Look to find commonalities across groups of employees, rather than focus on our differences (ie: age, gender, department)
  • Update outdated key messaging on job descriptions and ensure that we are selecting the appropriate staff to fit our culture
  • Integrate the considerations for millennial workforce into the senior leadership HR and OD strategies
  • Promote client and leader reflection with thought-provoking questions
  • Build strategies to engage youth in organized labour

 

Pictures from the Summit are available on Facebook

Infographics from the Summit are available on Facebook

Summit Proceedings can be downloaded here

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