Queen's University IRC

Month: August 2015

A Model for the New World of Work

Is Your Workplace in Motion?

Do you encourage collaboration between departments? Are you ready for a changing demographic in your workforce? Do you know how technology will change your organization in the future? This past spring, Queen’s IRC hosted a summit to explore our workplaces in motion. We invited people to come together to reflect, share and re-imagine how their workplaces could become more transparent, integrated and inspiring. Through an old world – new world lens, we explored how four inter-related trends, are shaping the new employee, the new work, and the new workplace.

Paul Juniper, Director, Queen's IRC

Director’s Note – Fall 2015

Are you ready for change? Our inaugural Workplace in Motion Summit, held on April 16th in Toronto, brought together over 100 HR, LR and OD professionals eager to learn about the forces that are changing the way we work, and to brainstorm strategies for organizations to prepare for the transformation of our workplace cultures and practices. At Queen’s IRC, we also must shift with the times. Our evidence-based programs are carefully designed and reviewed to blend foundational principles with innovative ideas and practices that facilitate change and nurture positive alliances across organizational functions.

What Can We Learn From Forsyth & Danisiewicz (1985)?

Successful Professionalization: What Can We Learn From Forsyth & Danisiewicz (1985)?

In this article, we take one of the more interesting and useful models of professionalization and apply it to the Human Resources field to see what insights can be had. There are a number of models of professionalization, and of those one of the more interesting and useful models is that of Forsyth & Danisiewicz (1985) . What makes this model so interesting and useful is that unlike other models it has a functional approach rather than a descriptive approach—that is, it looks at the process of professionalization (see figure 1).

Creating a Motivating Vision for Change Projects

The What of Change

Most experts advocate creating a vision as a necessary step in any change initiative. But managers have a tough time following this advice. Change vision statements are often too long, too confusing or too generic to motivate action in the direction of the change. It's tough to condense the vision into a couple of sentences or paragraphs that sing, but it is worthwhile to try. A clear vision is important for change leaders to think through because it forces you to identify exactly what you are aiming for instead of some vague, fuzzy or rosy picture of the future.

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