Queen's University IRC

Month: March 2015

Get ahead of the shift with the 2015 Queen's IRC Workplace in Motion Summit

Labour Relations and the Rise of the Millennial

Your union membership is getting younger. It's no secret that millennials are increasingly becoming a major demographic in the workforce. But the way they work, the tools they use and how they engage with others is completely different from earlier generations. Are you ready for them? Anne Grant, an expert in labour relations and mediation, will be exploring the evolution of the workforce and the impact on union-management relations at the Queen's IRC 2015 Workplace in Motion Summit on April 16 in Toronto.

Dr. Don Wood

Don Wood Lecture Series

Dr. Don Wood was the Director of the Queen’s Industrial Relations Centre (IRC) from 1960 to 1985. The W. Donald Wood Visiting Lectureship was established in 1987 by many of Don’s friends to honour his dedication to building the IRC. The IRC is internationally recognized for its outstanding research and continuing education programs, and for his many contributions to the wider industrial relations community in Canada and abroad. The Don Wood Visiting Lectureship brings to Queen’s University each year “a distinguished individual who has made an important contribution to industrial relations in Canada, or in other countries.

The WHY of the Change Management Process

The Why of Change

The first thing people want to know when a change is proposed is why this change is necessary. If you don't have a very good answer, then they will not buy into your change initiative. Statistics show that having a good percentage of supporters at the outset of a change initiative is strongly associated with success. This paper addresses how to create the felt need for change and a sense of urgency for the change throughout the organization.

Costly Conduct

Workplace Bullying and Harassment: Costly Conduct

As media scrutiny over schoolyard and cyberbullying pervade the news, allegations of workplace harassment and bullying are on the rise. While the popularization of the terms “bullying” and “harassment” has both educated and empowered employees to assert the right to a respectful workplace, it has conversely sometimes resulted in overuse of the terms and meritless complaints in relation to reasonable management measures. Employers are left with the difficult task of managing all competing interests to ensure a safe, respectful and productive work environment.

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