Archives for January 1998

Labour Law Leads the Way

Labour relations has always played a leadership role in Canada. Businesses and unions represent vital interests in our communities.

Their interactions have set many of the important ground rules by which we live. This is because work and work opportunities are central to us all. It is upon businesses or jobs that we build our lives. The content of labour law is therefore very telling about a society and its direction.

I thought it might be therapeutic, if not instructive, to reflect on this leadership role.

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Free Trade in North America: The Impact on Industrial Relations and Human Resources Management in Canada

This paper studies the impact of free trade on industrial relations and human resource management in Canada by examining the cases of two globally focused companies with a strong Canadian presence.

Download PDF: Free Trade in North America: The Impact on Industrial Relations and Human Resources Management in Canada

 

Canadian Labour Law and Industrial Relations: Back to the Future?

In a Q & A with Harry Arthurs, an eminent Professor of Labour Law from York University’s Osgoode Hall, the discussion ranges from the most important forces shaping employee relations in Canada to influences on legislation and the public policy framework.

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Layoffs and Survivors’ Career Motivation

Hundreds of thousands of Canadian workers have been laid off during the organizational restructuring of the past decade. Although the laid-off worker has been extensively studied, until recently there has been very little research on the effects of layoffs on those who remain in the downsized organization—the survivors. This study helps to close that gap in the research by identifying the factors that help to determine the career motivation of survivors. It also provides practical advice for minimizing the detrimental effects of layoffs.

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Internal Dispute Resolution

This research paper traces the development of Internal Dispute Resolution (IDR) as a way of resolving human rights issues internally without involving third parties. It also provides detailed practical advice for designing IDR programs, which improve employee morale and cost less when compared with more traditional, formal procedures.

Download PDF: Internal Dispute Resolution

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